Taste of Ethiopia

My wife, our law school son, and I headed to Taste of Ethiopia for lunch. None of us had had any prior experience with Ethiopian food, but the reviews were enticing. This restaurant is truly a dining jewel hidden away in a corner of a strip mall here in our own town of Pflugerville. If you live here and have not yet eaten here, you need to correct that omission as soon as possible.

We were met by the owner, Woinee Mariam, as we entered. My wife and I got the coffee while our son got the spiced iced tea. Since this was lunch, Woinee explained, it was not the full coffee service, but the coffee was still amazing. As a big poster declares, coffee truly is Ethiopia’s gift to the world. Apparently, in the full evening coffee service, Woinee will roast, grind, and brew the coffee in the traditional way. (Actually, I’m not sure if she does that at the restaurant or not, since it would certainly take time. But I’m anxious to find out!)

I then explained to Woinee that I had celiac and couldn’t eat wheat, barley, or rye. While not exactly an allergy, for practical purposes it can be treated that way. She said that her daughter can’t eat gluten or dairy, so she understands the diet. And she makes everything herself, so she knows exactly what is in it. Unfortunately, the injera (ethiopian flat bread) they typically make does contain wheat, so I couldn’t have any. However, Woinee said that if I call three days in advance, she can ferment the teff and make traditional gluten free injera for me! Wow! Obviously, that’s now high on my list of dining plans. I can’t wait!

I had the Doro Wat with rice (since I couldn’t have the injera). The chicken fell off the bone. The hardboiled egg was delicious. And the sauce was absolutely wonderful. I thought I would start with what is considered the national dish of Ethiopia for my first visit and it lived up to the reviews in every way.

My wife and son got the vegetarian lunch buffet. Woinee wouldn’t let them get forks! She came over and walked them through how to unroll and tear of pieces of injera and pick up and eat the food using the injera as their only utensil in the traditional Ethiopian manner. They tried some of everything and cleaned their plates – picking up all the food with their fingers.

At one point an older gentleman who was eating when we arrived left and Woinee ran out the door to ask him if he wanted some water to go. She came back in to get it for him and told us he was working outside and it was too hot not to have water. That sort of individual care and attention characterizes her approach to everyone. It’s as though we were guests in her home. When Woinee found out that our son was in law school, she gave him a big hug and told him that he must be very smart and a hard worker to be doing that.

If you live here and you’ve never eaten at Taste of Ethiopia, 1466 Grand Avenue Parkway, Pflugerville, TX, then go. You won’t regret it.

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2 Comments

  1. Dana Ames
    Posted June 22, 2009 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

    Although there are surely regional differences, I’ve been fortunate to be able to sample some Eritrean food. There are about 20 Eritrean families in my church, and it’s a treat when they prepare the fellowship meal after Liturgy. The dishes also adapt well to a meatless menu for fasting seasons.

    Pray for me, Scott- I’m facing my own fast, to prevent a descent into diabetes. I’m fighting too hard. God bless my doctor, who is making me actually look at my situation… but I. don’t. like. it. one. bit.

    Dana

  2. Posted June 22, 2009 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

    I will pray.

    I understand the not liking it part. Oddly, especially given my personality, I haven’t experienced a sense of fighting against this fast. I wouldn’t say it’s been easy, but the internal resistance, denial, anger, and the rest have simply not been present. I’m not sure why. I’ll take it as a gift.

    I had to look up Eritrea, which then pulled me into learning a bit about the history and politics of the region. Complicated, to say the least. I’m sure the food is similar.

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